Friday, October 31, 2014

Top 5 Infographics of the Week: Halloween Facts & Figures

It's that time of year again! While you may be too old to trick-or-treat, you never truly outgrow the spirit of Halloween. Halloween has become the second most commercially successful holiday in the US, with Christmas as the only bigger holiday. It is also the third biggest party day of the year, behind New Year's Eve and Super Bowl Sunday.

You already knew that Halloween was a huge commercial holiday, but did you know that Halloween started in Ireland? It was originally called Samhain, and it was a celebration to signify the end of the summer harvest. People came together to take stock of supplies and gear up for winter. Read the rest and learn more about Halloween in these fun infographics with Halloween Facts & Figures.



#1: Halloween Traditions Around the World by Rappler
  • Bobbing for apples is one of the most popular Halloween games in Ireland.
  • In China, they place food and water before photographs of their deceased relatives. They also make bonfires and light lanterns to guide the spirits on their path back to Earth. 
  • In Italy, they bake cakes in the shape of beans called Fave dei Morti or Beans of the Dead.
Please include attribution to blog.surveyanalytics.com with this graphic.

Halloween Traditions Around the World

Share this Image On Your Site



#2: Halloween: October 31st

  • In 2009, the total production of pumpkins by major pumpkin-producing states was 931 million pounds. Illinois is the largest producer by far, making 429 million pounds of pumpkins annually.
  • The next full moon on Halloween night will be on October 31, 2020.
  • Every year, 24.3 pounds of candy are consumed by Americans per capita. 

Please include attribution to blog.surveyanalytics.com with this graphic.

Halloween

Share this Image On Your Site



#3: What to Know About Halloween by HomeAway

  • Halloween originally started as a Celtic feast called Samhain, signaling the end of the summer harvest and preparing for Thanksgiving and the winter.
  • For the Samhain, the Celts wore costumes typically consisting of animal heads and skins. Today, costumes are obviously still worn, but more commonly of monsters, zombies or other creepy characters. 
  • In the Middle Ages, people dressed as ghosts and other malevolent creatures. They would perform in exchange for food and drink. This is what became what we know of modern day tick-or-treating.

Please include attribution to blog.surveyanalytics.com with this graphic.

What to Know About Halloween

Share this Image On Your Site



#4: Interesting Facts About Halloween by HalloweenExpress

  • The correct spelling of Halloween is actually Hallowe'en. Some other names include All Hallow's Eve, The Feast of the Dead, Haloween, and El Dia de los Muertos.
  • 86% of Americans decorate their homes in celebration of Halloween.
  • Halloween candy sales average about 2 billion dollars annually in the United States. 

Please include attribution to blog.surveyanalytics.com with this graphic.

Interesting Facts About Halloween

Share this Image On Your Site



#5: Halloween by the Numbers by History.com and Column Five

  • 90% of parents admit to sneaking goodies from their kids' Halloween candy bags.
  • Nearly 120 million Americans, both adults and children, dress up in costumes for Halloween. Even more, 11.5% of Americans dress up their pet for Halloween. 
  • 46% of American adults carve a pumpkin for Halloween.

Please include attribution to blog.surveyanalytics.com with this graphic.

Halloween By the Numbers

Share this Image On Your Site



Did you enjoy this post? Sign up for our weekly blog digest.

iframe {max-width:100%;} .embed{ width: 100%; }