Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Would Your Survey Responses Change if They Were a Game Instead of a Check Box?

I've already written about Jane McGonical in a previous article.  She's the author of "Reality is Broken" a new book about how to use our love of gaming to save the world.  On her new web site, she says that her mission in life is to see a game designer nominated for a Nobel Prize.  Let's wait and see -- it just might be her.

The really wonderful thing about this book is that it keeps you thinking long after you've closed the last page.  McGonigal has done such a great job of steadily spreading her message and rounding up grass roots support that more and more people are at least considering the possibility that playing games is NOT necessarily a waste of time.  Instead, it's an opportunity to create something.

I ran into this Gaming Infographic this morning and thought I'd share it with you:



At each step of this graphic you can ask yourself in what ways can we leverage gaming for good?

I was most impressed by the idea that nearly 50% of the parents surveyed played video games with their kids at least weekly.  This made me wonder about the interesting conversations that have the possibility of taking place depending on the game being played.  Granted playing Mario Galaxy may not engender as deep a conversation as Zelda or even SimCity, but think of the possibilities?

What are the possibilities for surveys or feedback conversations?

It's amazing what opens up as a possibility when you re-frame games from a waste of time to something productive. For example answering a question about what decision we MIGHT make is a completely different experience than actually making that decision within the context of a gaming challenge.  I'm already imagining survey games that take people through a grocery store with limits on money and time and having play the game.

Or what about purchasing a vehicle and taking it for a test drive?

Think about any purchasing and decision making opportunity see the ways in which creating a game out of it could potentially alter your decisions.

Watch this trend and see how surveys will change in the process.  If you're in the survey business, start thinking about ways to more closely mimic the decision experience for your respondents.

For the time being, we'll be seeing surveys in much the same way as we always have.  But keep a look out for sliding scales and smiley faces.  These will morph into more fun interactive question experiences and don't be surprised if you find yourself being part of a panel community of shoppers in a virtual world, spending, choosing and experiencing the product you use virtually.


Monday, May 30, 2011

How Will Gaming Influence the Survey Experience



The survey experience has the potential to really be "on the move".  We can take surveys on our mobile devices and that really has the potential to lighten the experience.

To make surveys more mobile, we've started thinking about them differently, making them shorter, making them more interactive (as in being able to take pictures of our environment with SurveySwipe) and finally, maybe making them more interactive and fun!

On the SurveyAnalytics blog, we're exploring the ways in which the action of clicking on box on an online survey is a different experience from actually being in a "game like" environment where you are moving through space and making decisions.

There's also a Gaming Infographic featured on the blog that goes through some amazing statistics that are really fun to think about as we go about the business of creating feedback.

In what ways can you see surveys morphing and changing?

How Will Gaming Influence the Survey Experience



The survey experience has the potential to really be "on the move".  We can take surveys on our mobile devices and that really has the potential to lighten the experience.

To make surveys more mobile, we've started thinking about them differently, making them shorter, making them more interactive (as in being able to take pictures of our environment with SurveySwipe) and finally, maybe making them more interactive and fun!

On the SurveyAnalytics blog, we're exploring the ways in which the action of clicking on box on an online survey is a different experience from actually being in a "game like" environment where you are moving through space and making decisions.

There's also a Gaming Infographic featured on the blog that goes through some amazing statistics that are really fun to think about as we go about the business of creating feedback.

In what ways can you see surveys morphing and changing?

Friday, May 27, 2011

What's New on SurveyAnalytics: Recording and Slides Now Available

[brightcove vid=962006757001&exp3=69413262001&surl=http://c.brightcove.com/services&pubid=69222484001&pk=AQ~~,AAAAEB37SCE~,qPzYMoHg_QVXfN_ppi7Wcrgb-jDlNozv&w=486&h=412]

[slideshare id=8118240&doc=whatsnewwebinar2-110526184735-phpapp01]
Thank you to all who attended "What's New on SurveyAnalytics." This was a 30 minute presentation on new tools currently available for all clients to use. If you missed the webinar you can view slides & recording here. If you have questions, contact your account manager & we will follow up with you.

Results of the Presidential Job Index Survey (week ending 5/27/2011)


Quick update on the results for the presidential job index survey. As a reminder this is a weekly survey that we conduct and we publish the results for the survey every Friday. To participate in this week's survey, please download the SurveySwipe application and take the survey dated 5/27/2011.

Remember, you get points that you can redeem for various rewards when you take our surveys. We have already distributed several paid apps like Angry Birds for free.

Highlights

  • Over 800 respondents took the survey.

  • 55% of the respondents think that approve of the job that President Obama is doing.

  • Respondents included 25% Democrats, 20% Republicans, 28% independents and 24% didn't want to associate with a party.


You can view the charts here or directly on your phone.  

What's New On SurveyAnalytics: Recording & Slides Now Available

[brightcove vid=962006757001&exp3=69413262001&surl=http://c.brightcove.com/services&pubid=69222484001&pk=AQ~~,AAAAEB37SCE~,qPzYMoHg_QVXfN_ppi7Wcrgb-jDlNozv&w=486&h=412]

[slideshare id=8118240&doc=whatsnewwebinar2-110526184735-phpapp01]
Thank you to all who attended "What's New on SurveyAnalytics." This was a 30 minute presentation on new tools currently available for all clients to use. If you missed the webinar you can view slides & recording here. If you have questions, contact your account manager & we will follow up with you.

Thursday, May 26, 2011

People Connect Around "Social Objects" Not "Likes", "Tweets" or Survey Responses

I wanted to share one of my morning reads with you today.  It's a deeply insightful rant about "social objects' by Hugh McLeod, a cartoonist, author and frequent Twitterer (@gapingvoid).  You may not recognize the name, but you've probably seen these fun cartoons and drawings around the web -- yeah -- that's HIM



A "social object is the reason two people are talking to each other"  says Hugh McLeod.  It's the subject of the conversation, it's the exchange of thoughts and ideas about a particular object.

I'm bringing this up because the rise of social media and technology has drawn our attention away from the actual subject of the conversation and has us occupied instead with things we can "count" such as Likes or Tweets or maybe even responses -- as if THOSE things matter.  And they don't.  What matters is the topic of the conversation and the actions we choose to take around that particular topic.

What's The Social Object Around Your Survey?

This really got me thinking about how we've seemed to approach the feedback process.  Today, there are so many opportunities to expand the conversation around the topic of the survey rather than just look at the answers and count the responses -- we can actually have a conversation!

How to Convert Surveys Into Conversations

If you haven't considered it yet, think about the ways that you can interconnect the various tools we have available here at Survey Analytics.  For example, you can start a bunch of little conversations by running a poll on MicroPoll.  You can then take what you learn there and create a viral survey using Facebook Connect.  Finally, you can even combine a series of MicroPoll surveys into a a single SurveySwipe mobile survey that you can push out to our panel or a panel that you've created.

Regardless of the ways in which you choose to expand the conversation -- just do that.  Don't let the survey be the only place where you collect feedback.  See it as an additional ingredient to expand the conversation.

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

The Marketers Guide to an ISO-Ready Customer Satisfaction Survey That Actually Improve Your Sales

If you're an industrial business that has to comply with ISO 9001 or any other derivative of an international manufacturing standard such as TS 16949 for those supplying the automotive industry or maybe GMP for those supplying pharmaceuticals and healthcare, then running an annual  customer satisfaction survey is a condition of doing business in your industry.

Any international manufacturing certification (such as ISO 9001, TS 16949 or GMP) requires regular customer satisfaction surveys and they also require that those survey results drive the improvements in the business.  And it's not just the ISO folks that require it.  Companies who are applying for quality awards such as the Malcolm Baldridge Award also require a robust customer satisfaction survey process that yields results that actually improve the business system.

Criteria for a Valid Customer Satisfaction Survey for ISO Certification

Well -- there isn't any specific criteria.  ISO 9001 won't tell you HOW to do your customer satisfaction survey, but they will tell you what you should be able to do with the results:

  • Determine how well you've performed with your customers

  • Figure out what unmet needs your customers have that you can deliver

  • Generate ideas for new products or services

  • Identify new opportunities


Don't let this be an excuse to just create any old customer satisfaction survey.  Because it will come back to bite you in the end.  Use the freedom that the ISO standard allows to create a customer satisfaction survey that achieves all these points and then some.  

Setting Objectives for Your Survey

The good news is that the standard has actually set some general objectives that you can use as a baseline or guideline to get you started.  Your job would be to put some specifics behind those objectives.

WARNING - make your objectives as specific as possible.  You can't put an improvement team on the task to improve something general such as "overall satisfaction" if you don't know what specific elements are behind that.

Creating Customer Satisfaction Survey Questions That Meet Objectives and Drive ISO Improvement Measures

The first objective is to Determine how well you're meeting customers expectations.  Simply asking the question as "Rate how well has (COMPANY X) meet your expectations-- on a scale of 1-10.  Will give you nothing but garbage.  Say the results came back as having an average rating of 5.8 out of 10 in meeting your customer's expectations.  What changes would you put in place to increase that score?  You don't know because you didn't ask that.  You asked a general question about their expectations instead of a specific one.

The way to solve this problem is by using an Importance/Satisfaction style question.  Create a list of attributes that are important to your customer  (such as having a real person answer the phone)  then have them rate how important that is to them and then have them rate their level of satisfaction with YOUR company.

And here's a nice little twist you can do.  Use the Loop function and ask them what other alternatives they use, and have them rate YOUR competitors' performance as well.

These results are GOLDEN and will yield a chart that will show you exactly what's important to your customer and to what degree you and the competition are meeting those expectations.  Not only THAT, but it will also attack that other objectives of identifying new opportunities, finding unmet needs as well as generating new product and service ideas!  All of that accomplished with just one series of questions.

Net Promoter Score is JUST as Relevant to Industrial Customers

Industrial consumers are people too.  They are not robots, they speak, they send email, they hang on Facebook, LinkedIn Groups, Twitter and use the same products and services that regular consumers do.  Just because they work for an organization that sells heavy duty machinery or some kind of widget doesn't mean that they leave their human-ness at the door.

That said -- industrial purchasers actually talk to each other and refer the companies, products and services that they use.  In fact, in my research I've discovered that many loyal supplier relationships are formed via referral.  And if you've ever seen industrial web sites, you'd notice that search engine optimization and marketing savvy aren't exactly what attracts customers -- it's word of mouth.

In every customer satisfaction survey that you do -- include the Net Promoter Score question.  "How likely are you to refer (COMPANY X) to a friend or a colleague?"  Notice that I've adjusted the question to read "colleague" instead of family member .  I did this because so many of my clients don't like to use "family member" for industrial products.  Of course, I disagree with this approach.  I think that using the term "family member" actually connotes a certain level of goodwill.  You would NEVER refer something to a friend or family member that you didn't think was in their best interest.  To me, it connotes a higher level of trust.  But use your judgement and the phrase that works best for your industry.

A word of warning about NPS.  Just because it's called the "Ultimate Question" and is said to be the only question you'd ever need.  Don't use it alone -- like other general questions, it doesn't give anyone in your organizations any specifics to work on.  It's just an index for gaging improvement.

Find Out What's New At SurveyAnalytics

Free Webinar for all SurveyAnalytics license holders!

Find Out What's New At SurveyAnalytics

Thursday May 26th at 9:30 AM PST

Sign up here: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/474713098

Join us on Thursday May 26th at 9:30 AM PST as we showcase fun new product offerings available from SurveyAnalytics. If you’ve seen some new items and wonder what they are, this is a great forum to satisfy your curiosity! Dedicated exclusively for existing clients, this session will allow you to view what’s available from SurveyAnalytics and think about expansion opportunities to your current research strategy in the near future.

New tools we will be showcasing include:

-SurveyPocket: The first offline and online mobile field research app for iPad/iPhone.

-MicroPanel: Creating your own communities just got easier than ever.

-New features and aesthetics added to SurveyAnalytics to enhance the respondent experience.

We will then open up a time for a Q&A session and also include an opportunity for you, the user, to make suggestions and have other users vote on them. In fact you can start this right now!

Add suggestions/feedback and vote on ideas for SurveyAnalytics here: http://whatsnewonsurveyanalytics.ideascale.com

We hope you are able to join us for this webinar presentation and look forward to your opinions and feedback.

Click here to sign up: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/474713098

Thank you!

The SurveyAnalytics Team

Sunday, May 22, 2011

What's YOUR Mobile Marketing Strategy - Here are 6 Great Ideas



In a recent post on the AMEX Open Forum, Ivana Taylor provides 6 Ways to Get and Keep Customers Using Your Mobile Device.

Here is a quick summary of her tips:


  1. Generate a 2-dimensional QR code and engage your customers and contacts with coupons or incentives.

  2. Get Paid.  There are apps for that.  I use a PayPal app on my Android device that does the trick nicely.

  3. Run Surveys - Ask a Panel.  Surveys can be FUN !  Why not run your next survey using SurveySwipe mobile survey platform.  It's super easy.  You can ask an existing panel to answer questions OR you can upload your customer list and create your own panel.

  4. Customer Service.  Most CRM systems like SalesForce.com have customer service apps that will allow you to help your customers on site.  You can also create an app just for your customers and deliver service on the fly.

  5. Education and Training.  YouTube is mobile - why not deliver demonstrations, training and education via mobile phone?

  6. Advertising.  This one is obvious, but can get overwhelming because there are so many options.  Use text messaging with Fanminder, offer alerts so that your customers can receive specials and offers straight to their device.





What's YOUR Mobile Marketing Strategy - Here are 6 Great Ideas



In a recent post on the AMEX Open Forum, Ivana Taylor provides 6 Ways to Get and Keep Customers Using Your Mobile Device.

Here is a quick summary of her tips:


  1. Generate a 2-dimensional QR code and engage your customers and contacts with coupons or incentives.

  2. Get Paid.  There are apps for that.  I use a PayPal app on my Android device that does the trick nicely.

  3. Run Surveys - Ask a Panel.  Surveys can be FUN !  Why not run your next survey using SurveySwipe mobile survey platform.  It's super easy.  You can ask an existing panel to answer questions OR you can upload your customer list and create your own panel.

  4. Customer Service.  Most CRM systems like SalesForce.com have customer service apps that will allow you to help your customers on site.  You can also create an app just for your customers and deliver service on the fly.

  5. Education and Training.  YouTube is mobile - why not deliver demonstrations, training and education via mobile phone?

  6. Advertising.  This one is obvious, but can get overwhelming because there are so many options.  Use text messaging with Fanminder, offer alerts so that your customers can receive specials and offers straight to their device.





Friday, May 20, 2011

What's New on SurveyAnalytics!

Free Webinar for all SurveyAnalytics license holders!

Find Out What's New At SurveyAnalytics

Thursday May 26th at 9:30 AM PST

Sign up here: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/474713098

Join us on Thursday May 26th at 9:30 AM PST as we showcase fun new product offerings available from SurveyAnalytics. If you’ve seen some new items and wonder what they are, this is a great forum to satisfy your curiosity! Dedicated exclusively for existing clients, this session will allow you to view what’s available from SurveyAnalytics and think about expansion opportunities to your current research strategy in the near future.

New tools we will be showcasing include:

-SurveyPocket: The first offline and online mobile field research app for iPad/iPhone.

-MicroPanel: Creating your own communities just got easier than ever.

-New features and aesthetics added to SurveyAnalytics to enhance the respondent experience.

We will then open up a time for a Q&A session and also include an opportunity for you, the user, to make suggestions and have other users vote on them. In fact you can start this right now!

Add suggestions/feedback and vote on ideas for SurveyAnalytics here: http://whatsnewonsurveyanalytics.ideascale.com

We hope you are able to join us for this webinar presentation and look forward to your opinions and feedback.

Click here to sign up: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/474713098

Thank you!

The SurveyAnalytics Team

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Learn to Design Killer Surveys From our friends at Research Rockstar

Want to take a crash course on survey design?



Our friends at Research Rockstar are hosting an in-person survey design class on June 9th in Waltham Massachusetts.

This is a fast, practical class that answers key questions about planning and writing online surveys.

The fee is $89 per person, but we have a discount code for our readers: enter code 10FFL to get $10 off.

Learn to Design Killer Surveys From our friends at Research Rockstar

Want to take a crash course on survey design?



Our friends at Research Rockstar are hosting an in-person survey design class on June 9th in Waltham Massachusetts.

This is a fast, practical class that answers key questions about planning and writing online surveys.

The fee is $89 per person, but we have a discount code for our readers: enter code 10FFL to get $10 off.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

HTC's Phone Targeted Toward Women - Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down?

I ran into this interesting article on BNET; HTC is Making a Smart Phone for Women.  At first, I thought that this was going to be an article extolling the virtues of using research to create a product targeted at a market with some unique needs, but Damon Brown read the news in a completely different way -- that HTC had completely missed the boat on this one and will join the ranks of other failed segment-based products such as the Samsung phone targeted at teens.

Perception Driving Data Interpretation

Granted this new product may or may not happen -- after all, these reports were based on information coming from a "trusted source" which leaves a lot of room for error and corporate mind changing.  But that isn't what I'm focused on.  I'm focused on the data interpretation.

The article Damon wrote was based on information coming from another article written in This is My Next, so one blog referencing another and neither from HTC.  Both authors were basically insulted by HTC effort to create a phone with specific features targeted at women.

As I think about this - it doesn't seem that it's the "targeted at women" that's the problem, rather it's the assumptions that were made about what would make the phone specifically appealing to women and, as it turns out, the features were :
COLOR -  "greenish hue — we are told it’s somewhere between a forest and sea green and the color was selected for its “calming” effect. Our source was shown a few mockups, but each of them had a greenish-gray rubber back so “women can have a better grip of the phone.”

"shopping comparison and calorie counting apps — you know, because every woman watches the pounds"

accessories. First up is a wireless charging dock with built-in speakers. The phone apparently switches to alarm mode when you set it down on the charging pad. Speaking of speakers, there will also be a square-shaped speaker that attaches to a car visor and supports voice recognition. There will also be a “stylish” matching Bluetooth headset available.

The last accessory is certainty the most interesting. It’s said to be called the “charm indicator” and the cube-shaped device comes with a hook for attaching to a purse or bag. As we tried to show in the image, it lights up to notify you when you’ve got a new message or missed call. We expected this to pair wirelessly with the phone, however, we are told that it attaches to phone with a cord — apparently, the cord also makes it easier for women to fish the phone out of that deep purse. It sounds like a pretty crazy idea, but one that actually makes a bit of sense for those that constantly lose their phone in their bag and want to easily see if they have a new message.

I'm curious about what YOU think.  All of this information came from an insider and is based on focus groups HTC is said to have conducted with women in their 20's and 30's.  There is no mention of whether additional research has been conducted and what the results of that were.

If you were HTC what would you do next?  How would you handle the project?  Are people being simply too sensitive?  I mean why do we criticize car makers for not designing cars that are women friendly and then bash on HTC because they want to make it easier to dig your phone out of your purse?


Tuesday, May 17, 2011

SurveySwipe Webinar: Slides and Recording Now Available

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Thank you for all who attended our webinar presentation on SurveySwipe. Please review the slides and recording and let us know if you have questions or comments. Let us know your thoughts: Do you believe mobile research will catch on with consumers or not?

SurveySwipe Webinar: Slides and Recording Now Available

[brightcove vid=947670791001&exp3=69413262001&surl=http://c.brightcove.com/services&pubid=69222484001&pk=AQ~~,AAAAEB37SCE~,qPzYMoHg_QVXfN_ppi7Wcrgb-jDlNozv&w=486&h=412]
Thank you for all who attended our webinar presentation on SurveySwipe. Please review the slides and recording and let us know if you have questions or comments. Let us know your thoughts: Do you believe mobile research will catch on with consumers or not?

SurveySwipe Webinar: Slides and Recording Now Available

[brightcove vid=947670791001&exp3=69413262001&surl=http://c.brightcove.com/services&pubid=69222484001&pk=AQ~~,AAAAEB37SCE~,qPzYMoHg_QVXfN_ppi7Wcrgb-jDlNozv&w=486&h=412]
Thank you for all who attended our webinar presentation on SurveySwipe. Please review the slides and recording and let us know if you have questions or comments. Let us know your thoughts: Do you believe mobile research will catch on with consumers or not?

Monday, May 16, 2011

How to Use Market Research Techniques to Drive Sales

Traditional market research functions used to live on the more analytical side of most big companies.  The product and marketing managers come to them as technical advisors to ask questions.  They would create and structure scientifically valid focus groups and surveys and weeks or months into the project and much analysis, a marketing campaign would come together and sales would start coming in.  This process didn't happen EVERY time -- but it did happen quite a bit.  Even in the industrial bare bones marketing companies I worked with.

But with the onset of social media and DIYMarketing tools, the time lag between marketing research to sales has shrunk significantly.  I'm struck by how many traditionally "marketing research" functions have migrated to other areas of the business.

Take design testing for web sites.  This used to be a marketing research function, but with Google Analytics and Google Optimizer Landing Page Oprimization and the testing of message effectiveness has earned a new name and a new place in the marketing function.  In my opinion it's still "research" of sorts, just called by a different name.

Net Promoter Score as also moved into a more active role in business.  Of course companies still ask if you're "Likely to refer" but in addition to that, they also give you the opportunity to put your money where your mouth is and refer right then and there - by giving you the option to tell a friend.  Another twist on this is to give your site visitors the option to give you feedback on the spot.  I saw this example in the Marketing Technology Blog:



Of course, you can also use tools like IdeaScale and MicroPoll to create other customer engagement opportunities on your web sites and blogs.    Then use the information that customers provide to create an offer that they are more likely to buy more quickly.

The idea isn't that market research is smaller or less.  The need for customer information hasn't gone away, in fact, it's become more important than ever.  What's missing is the creative applications and strategies that market research provides to help shorten the information to closed sale .

Friday, May 13, 2011

Why Are We Better At Games Than At Real Life?

If We Played at Life With the Same Intensity as We Play Games - What Would Be Possible?

Last week Vivek Bhaskaran was a keynote presenter at the TMRE conference along with Kevin Keeker from Zynga (the creators of such epic online games as Farmville and Angry Birds).  And together they tackled the subject of why these games are so engaging and so all consuming and how to take advantage of these benefits in research.

But there is a bigger, more interesting tsunami of a trend that we are sitting on that many of us have noticed, but few have put into the context of productivty -- GAMING as a way to transform our world.

I spoke with Vivek a few days after his presentation and asked why he was so engrossed in gaming.  He told me that he had read this book Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal and it really got HIM thinking about how HE can change the world of business by harnessing some of the untapped energy and creativity that's currently being spent in virtual worlds.

First, Let's Look at Some FACTS that will BLOW YOU AWAY

  • 69% of all heads of household play computer and video games.

  • 97% of youth play computer and video games

  • In 2009 61% of surveyed CEOs, CFOs and other senior executives say they take daily game breaks at work.


Overall we invest 3 billion hours a week playing online games!  It's no wonder most people think it's a waste of time -- 3 billion hours a week dedicated to escaping reality.  Why spend 3 billion hours working something FAKE when we could be solving the problems of the world?



Why Games Are More Engaging Than Our Lives

Games are more engaging because we CHOOSE the activity of playing them.  They challenge our thinking, they give us immediate feedback as to how well we are doing and they reward us for our efforts.  And the big unsaid is that the real world holds serious consequences for failure and that strikes FEAR into most of our hearts and keeps us from taking risks which otherwise might really pay off.

What's Any of This Have to Do With Research?

It was research that uncovered these numbers that got Jane McGonigal asking these questions.   And it's a million curious minds put to task to uncover the myriad ways to engage people to share information, engage with our products and our brands and then glean a sense for how to improve it.

We've just been taking ourselves, our products and our work TOO SERIOUSLY.  I'm not saying to slack off - I'm challenging us to remove the layer of fear that has us playing it safe and open ourselves up to the possibilities that only become available to us when we play.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

What Birtherism Teaches Us About Polling



Though in the past few days, given the death of Osama bin Laden, the news cycle has dramatically changed, I still wanted to draw your attention to a recent article in The Atlantic concerning the “birther” debate. Speaking for myself, and not Research Access, I feel the need to point out that I would normally never want to draw your attention to the birther debate; I think it’s political silliness. But from my perspective as editor of Research Access, this article has a real market research slant worth considering.

The article is entitled, “What Birtherism Teaches Us About Polling: An Expert’s Take.” The article discusses a theory put forth by Gary Langer, who heads up Langer Research Associates and directs polling for ABC News.
A wave of recent surveys have shown that doubts about Obama’s birthplace are stunningly prevalent. In aCBS/New York Times poll, 25 percent of all respondents and 45 percent of Republicans said they do not think Obama was born in the United States. A total of 18 percent said they weren’t sure. According to Fox News, 24 percent do not think Obama was born in America.

Maybe, just maybe, those poll respondents don’t actually think what they say they think, Langer suggests. Maybe they say all this for some other reason — such as that they just don’t like the president.

Mr. Langer’s theory tackles the concept of “expressed belief” vs “affirmed belief.” In other words, what people say in response to a survey question, versus what they actually believe. According to the article, Langer tackled this topic further, along with Patrick Moynihan of Harvard and Peyton Craighill of The Washington Post, in a paper presented at the May 2010 American Association for Public Opinion Research Conference. The paper discussed how political and policy opinions might be influencing the numbers on global warming. They summarized their conclusion as follows:
We suggest further that there can be a message-sending element to the way respondents answer survey questions – not always to answer the question in the way we imagine, but in the way they desire. Respondents who oppose or are skeptical about proposed policy solutions on global warming, yet who see such policies as increasingly likely given the change in administration, may be more apt to express opposition to such policies by any means available – including by withdrawing their expressed belief that global warming is occurring. They use such questions as a vehicle to express antipathy toward the solution, not to voice a firm disbelief in the existence of the problem.

I think we’ve all known this for quite some time – responses to surveys do not always contain an affirmed belief. Often they express what the respondent thinks the questioner wants to hear, or even worse, they respond based on the way the question was worded, which lead them to an emotional conclusion. This is rocky terrain for a market researcher, to be sure. Polls such as these have long been used as the concrete measure of public opinion, and not just in politics. The market research industry as a whole runs the risk of eroding the value of its products and services if we don’t get this right.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. Have you experienced this issues of expressed vs. affirmed belief in your own studies? How have you tried to counter it (and/or account for it) in the past? How can we as market researchers continue to ensure that our studies accurately reflect the affirmed belief of our respondents?


About Joshua Hoffman - Joshua Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of Research Access.

Monday, May 9, 2011

Take the Time to CONSIDER and You'll Get Better Results

The following book review appeared in Small Business Trends last week. I'm bringing it to you today because I've been reflecting on our tendency to jump into action when we should be taking the time to think things through a bit.

Online market research tools like MicroPoll, SurveySwipe, Pocket Survey and quick analysis of social media text might be pushing us to rush into action instead of doing what "Listening" implies -- and that is to stop and take the time the listen and think about what is being said, put it into context, consider several alternatives and pick the best alternative.  

Daniel Patrick Forrester compiles studies, research and insight that will certainly make you think!

Consider: Harnessing the Power of Reflective ThinkingI always like to say that I’m on the “Get Rich Slow Plan” mainly because I need to feel good about the fact that I haven’t quite figured out how to make a million dollars in 30 days.  Well, guess what?  I’ve just found out that slowing down is a good thing!

At least, that’s what I’m reading in Consider: Harnessing the Power of Reflective Thinking in Your Organization. I think I received this review copy because the publishing houses have somehow caught on to the fact that I’m an absolute sucker for any book written about brains, time, ideas and business.  They must also know that I’m looking for any excuse to slow down.  If this sounds like you, then you, too, might find Consider an interesting book.

Daniel Patrick Forrester (@DPForrester) has pulled together a really intriguing read that is bound to make you feel better about taking the time to stand there and do nothing.  Overall, this is a book about NOT rushing in, NOT multi-tasking and giving yourself the permission to stop the merry-go-round and get off for a while.  In fact, the more critical the situation, the more imperative it is to take the time to think about what’s actually going on, get clear on context, and develop a sense of understanding so that you can respond in the best possible manner.

Consider Shows That Acting Too Quickly Can Mean Disaster

In an introductory video on the Consider website Forrester explains how our hurried, always-on, always-in-action lifestyle doesn’t leave us enough time to actually think through all the possibilities. In fact, only 10 percent of our day is actually spent thinking!  And when you consider that every time we are interrupted, it takes 11 minutes to get back to what we were doing, you can see how much productivity and time is wasted.

For some reason we seem to think that when situations get risky or tough, the best thing we can do is swing into action.  In fact, the opposite is true.  The higher the stakes in a situation, the more important it is to step back from the data and look for meaning.

Inside the Book

Daniel Forrester interviewed people who make a point of giving themselves uninterrupted thinking time before taking significant action.  One of the more surprising interview subjects was Tio Hardiman.  Tio’s story starts with gang violence in the South Side of Chicago and ends with the creation of a “new mental model for looking at violence.”  Instead of reacting violently in violent situations, Hardiman got the idea of adding credible people to potentially violent situations so that they would interrupt the violence before it reached a tipping point.

I also love the example from the seemingly opposite side of the tracks – Wall Street.  As it turns out, although Wall Street isn’t as physically violent, its stressful situations mimic the perceived risk level of violent streets.  In either case, failure to take the time to think about the downside of your actions within the system can lead to destruction.

Forrester’s interviews show how much better your solutions and outcomes can be if you just take the time to process and problem-solve as well as get other people involved.

This is a super-current book because it actually references the BP Deep Water Horizon oil spill and how Thad Allen took the time to actually think through a problem instead of jumping to the first solution that came into his head.  Forrester also interviewed General Petraeus and shows how he planned the Iraq surge strategy by gathering expert insights from a variety of experts that included Vietnam veterans and sociologists.

Consider Is a Must-Read for All Leaders

This is a relevant book for leaders in every facet of our lives: CEOs, politicians, parents and entrepreneurs.   As a leader you need to hold yourself back from having to get results this minute.  Remember the phrase “Fools rush in,” and give the people on your team the freedom to stop and get perspective before taking action.

Of course, you may not want to luxuriate with every circumstance; after all, the deadlines and demands on your time won’t go away.  And this is exactly where Consider will come in handy--to help you prioritize and choose exactly where and when you will make and take the time to think and…consider.

To keep up with Daniel Forrester and read his latest articles, check out his blog, DanielForrester.

Friday, May 6, 2011

Check Out What’s New on SurveySwipe: The Hottest Mobile Panel Research Platform

Tuesday May 17th, 2011

10:00AM PST

Sign up here: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/876617530

As consumers move their lives into their smartphones it’s imperative that we follow and innovate on that trend. Along those lines we've launched SurveySwipe: The hottest mobile panel research platform in the market. The solution will allow you to:

* Build a community of users who've downloaded the SurveySwipe smartphone app.

Available on all 4 major smartphone platforms – iPhone/iOS, Android, Windows Phone 7 and BlackBerry

* Allow users then get points for filling out surveys – incentivized research. Better engagement.

* Let users customize their  profile for segmentation purposes (Gender, Age, et. al.)

* Push Notification and Location – obviously both these constructs play a huge role in collecting feedback. Smartphones give us that ability right off the bat.

We’ve partnered with Amazon and Apple to give AMZN Gitft Certs. and Apps as the currency for redeeming points. We believe that, the App model for incentivizing users to take surveys, is not only the appropriate one, but the one of the most innovative solutions in the marketplace today. In fact, we think is innovative enough to apply for a patent in this!

Here is our “Pitch Deck” on SurveySwipe:  http://admin.surveyanalytics.com/images/pdf/SurveySwipe-Overview-V6.pdf

The presentation will include a Q&A session and slides and recordings will be available on our blog:

http://blog.surveyswipe.com

If you are interested in learning more about SurveySwipe and how it can used for your research initiatives join us for our webinar on Tuesday 5/17/11 at 10AM PST

Sign up here: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/876617530

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Check Out What's New on SurveySwipe: The Hottest Mobile Panel Research Platform

Tuesday May 17th, 2011

10:00AM PST

Sign up here: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/876617530

As consumers move their lives into their smartphones it’s imperative that we follow and innovate on that trend. Along those lines we've launched SurveySwipe: The hottest mobile panel research platform in the market. The solution will allow you to:

* Build a community of users who've downloaded the SurveySwipe smartphone app.

Available on all 4 major smartphone platforms – iPhone/iOS, Android, Windows Phone 7 and BlackBerry

* Allow users then get points for filling out surveys – incentivized research. Better engagement.

* Let users customize their  profile for segmentation purposes (Gender, Age, et. al.)

* Push Notification and Location – obviously both these constructs play a huge role in collecting feedback. Smartphones give us that ability right off the bat.

We’ve partnered with Amazon and Apple to give AMZN Gitft Certs. and Apps as the currency for redeeming points. We believe that, the App model for incentivizing users to take surveys, is not only the appropriate one, but the one of the most innovative solutions in the marketplace today. In fact, we think is innovative enough to apply for a patent in this!

Here is our “Pitch Deck” on SurveySwipe:  http://admin.surveyanalytics.com/images/pdf/SurveySwipe-Overview-V6.pdf

The presentation will include a Q&A session and slides and recordings will be available on our blog:

http://blog.surveyswipe.com

If you are interested in learning more about SurveySwipe and how it can used for your research initiatives join us for our webinar on Tuesday 5/17/11 at 10AM PST

Sign up here: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/876617530

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

We're All in the Marketing Business

This article originally appeared on the AMEX Open Forum.  I'm writing about "marketing" in general.  But you can easily make this apply to market research.

With today's technology, it's easy and much more fun to integrate functions that were considered separate departments - but now can work together.

 

Why are you in business?  Let’s cut through all those warm and fuzzy reasons and get right to it.  You’re in business to make money (preferably you keep more than you make).

I’m not here to minimize the significance of the products or services that you sell.  After all, if it weren’t for what you’re offering, you wouldn’t have a business.  But this is where we all get caught up in a modern misconception that we are in the widget business.  And it’s this fallacy that is actually at cause when sales are slumped.

Mousetraps don’t sell themselves

Your mouse trap really isn’t going to sell itself.  Go ahead and give it a try.  Build a bunch of product and pile it from floor to ceiling and watch what happens.  “Of course nothing happens,” you say “because you need sales people to sell it.”  This is very true.

Now, go get some sales people and show them your product.  If it’s small enough, they might be able to actually carry it around and push it on their mothers and neighbors.  Some will be wildly successful and many won’t.  That’s because selling in today’s environment requires what I like to call an “attractor strategy”.  You might call it marketing.

Throwing sales people WITHOUT a marketing strategy and marketing support is what we do when we think we’re in the widget business.

You might think that I’m going to take you down the long argument about what’s sales and what’s marketing.  I won’t.  For small businesses who wear ten hats at a time, they are one and the same.  When you hire a sales person and don’t give them marketing materials or a web site or anything, they will eventually start creating marketing materials themselves.  Not elegant, not pretty, but the only way they’re going to have a chance at being successful.

What happens when you decide you’re in the marketing business?

The first thing that happens is you take your attention OFF the widget and put it ON the people who are most likely to give you money for it. Take a moment and do that.  Ignore the widget and focus JUST on the people who will give you money.

If you force your customers to  focus on the widget, then they don’t see any difference between your widget and the other guys.  So they complain about price and everything else.  Widgets don’t have value –value is what you uncover about the person who will give you money.

Your customers will only give you money if you address what’s important to them when they are buying what you are selling.  Think about FedEx.  They don’t sell envelopes or boxes – they sell “getting your package delivered by 10:30am” because THAT is what’s important to their customer and that is what their customers pay top dollar for.

Come up with a list of five to seven items that are important to your customers.  Don’t list features, list things they might actually say to themselves.  For example, if you were a mover, what might be important to your customer is that you don’t break their stuff.  The feature might be the wrapping, or packing, but they don’t care how you wrap it or carry it, just that their stuff shows up looking exactly like it did when it left their home.

It’s this magical list of five to seven items that trip your customer’s  trigger that should drive how your widget occurs out in the marketplace.

Marketing systems have value to customers and to buyers

In his bestselling book Built to Sell John Warrillow’s character, Alex learns that a business that runs a like a system or money machine increases in value as well as in appeal to buyers and owners alike.   Alex develops a marketing system that includes a standard product and service.  Then he created a standard way to sell, create, deliver and pay for the service.  The changes that he made turned his business into a repeatable, teachable, sellable business that customers valued and he enjoyed running.

Being in the marketing business is more fulfilling

Being in the marketing business (even if you make physical product) is so much more fulfilling because you spend your days looking for ways to make your customers happier than they were the day before.  It’s like being Santa every day.

If you aren’t really a people person, then, by all means, run your business from where you get  the most joy and can bring the most value.  But be sure to find someone to run that business that LOVES your customers and is committed to bringing them more satisfaction and ease in living their life through your product and service.

Putting your company in the marketing business doesn’t negate your product or service.  It brings more depth and differentiation to it.  When you focus on identifying your ideal customer, and providing a product or service that’s important to them – you will reap more profit for it.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

SurveyAnalytics Partners with Zynga to Find Innovative Ways to Interact With Online Gamers

[slideshare id=7821399&doc=sa-zynga-vivek-kevin-final-110503140455-phpapp02]
What do you get when you cross online surveys with online games?

At the TMRE conference this past week in Chicago, Vivek Bhaskaran of SurveyAnalytics and Kevin Keeker of Zynga presented on an innovative way to interact and collect data from gamers by using social gaming as a research methodology case study.

You would have to be living under a rock if you've never heard of FarmVille, CafeWorld, Mafia, or CityVille - All games developed by Zynga. They are the number one developer on Facebook, and by tying quick 1-2 question surveys into the gaming experience and drawing from Facebook's data they can provide enormous amounts of feedback quite quickly.

Through presentations such as these we are finding more evidentiary support that social media interaction is becoming a key tool in data gathering process. In addition the incentives offered to users are moving away from the typical online gift cards to offering apps and online game pieces respondents can use to enhance their gaming experience. Simply ignoring this factor is no longer an option. Although you may not be in the online gaming industry, Zynga's partnership with SurveyAnalytics is an example you can review to help you think of ways to engage your customers for future research studies.

Feel free to click through the slides to view and download the slides above. (Note - Must have Mac's Key to open downloaded file.)

SurveyAnalytics Partners with Zynga to Find Innovative Ways to Interact With Online Gamers

[slideshare id=7821399&doc=sa-zynga-vivek-kevin-final-110503140455-phpapp02]
What do you get when you cross online surveys with online games?

At the TMRE conference this past week in Chicago, Vivek Bhaskaran of SurveyAnalytics and Kevin Keeker of Zynga presented on an innovative way to interact and collect data from gamers by using social gaming as a research methodology case study.

You would have to be living under a rock if you've never heard of FarmVille, CafeWorld, Mafia, or CityVille - All games developed by Zynga. They are the number one developer on Facebook, and by tying quick 1-2 question surveys into the gaming experience and drawing from Facebook's data they can provide enormous amounts of feedback quite quickly.

Through presentations such as these we are finding more evidentiary support that social media interaction is becoming a key tool in data gathering process. In addition the incentives offered to users are moving away from the typical online gift cards to offering apps and online game pieces respondents can use to enhance their gaming experience. Simply ignoring this factor is no longer an option. Although you may not be in the online gaming industry, Zynga's partnership with SurveyAnalytics is an example you can review to help you think of ways to engage your customers for future research studies.

Feel free to click through the slides to view and download the slides above. (Note - Must have Mac's Key to open downloaded file.)

SurveyAnalytics Partners with Zynga to Find Innovative Ways to Interact With Online Gamers

[slideshare id=7821399&doc=sa-zynga-vivek-kevin-final-110503140455-phpapp02]
What do you get when you cross online surveys with online games?

At the TMRE conference this past week in Chicago, Vivek Bhaskaran of SurveyAnalytics and Kevin Keeker of Zynga presented on an innovative way to interact and collect data from gamers by using social gaming as a research methodology case study.

You would have to be living under a rock if you've never heard of FarmVille, CafeWorld, Mafia, or CityVille - All games developed by Zynga. They are the number one developer on Facebook, and by tying quick 1-2 question surveys into the gaming experience and drawing from Facebook's data they can provide enormous amounts of feedback quite quickly.

Through presentations such as these we are finding more evidentiary support that social media interaction is becoming a key tool in data gathering process. In addition the incentives offered to users are moving away from the typical online gift cards to offering apps and online game pieces respondents can use to enhance their gaming experience. Simply ignoring this factor is no longer an option. Although you may not be in the online gaming industry, Zynga's partnership with SurveyAnalytics is an example you can review to help you think of ways to engage your customers for future research studies.

Feel free to click through the slides to view and download the slides above. (Note - Must have Mac's Key to open downloaded file.)

Monday, May 2, 2011

Osama bin Laden's Death Survey



One of the key advantages of the SurveySwipe community based mobile research platform is that we can send out quick surveys near realtime. When we hear about noteworthy events anywhere across the globe, we conduct surveys within the SurveySwipe community.
Recently, SurveySwipe conducted a survey to measure the pulse of how people are feeling about Osama bin Laden's death at the hands of the U.S forces in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Following are the highlights of the survey:

Do you feel safer now that Osama bin Laden is no more?

A whopping 60% respondents think that they don't necessarily feel safer and think that the fight against terrorism is not over.

Do you think the burial at sea fair?

53% said American people deserved to see the body.  30% said they were not sure but are relieved that he is gone. Only about 17% said that it was fair because he paid the ultimate price with his death.

What could have been done differently to handle Osama bin Laden's death?

Most comments were about how it could have been a bit more open and not so rushed. Here are snippets of what some people said:

"Too fast, where is the proof?"
"Should have done it 10 years ago!!!"
"Would have liked to see his body"

Here is the link to the report - if you want to see more detailed results. Note that you can also see the results on your phone if you have downloaded the SurveySwipe application and participated in the survey.

Ten Ways the iPad Will Radically Change Market Research

The following article is a re-print from the Research Access blog.  With millions of iPads flying off the shelves and new tablet brands hitting the shelves, it's time to start thinking about how to integrate these terrific new tools into our market research strategies. Less than a year since its introduction, millions of iPads have been sold. It already appears to be cannibalizing sales of low-end laptops and is set to bypass sales of netbooks. And there is a lot more to come… availability of iPads in Best Buy in time for the Christmas season, a variety of Android based tablets from other manufacturers, and who knows what else. This is just the beginning of the Tablet Age Ok, so we’ve heard all this before, about how tablet computers are going to shake up market research. But there has never been a product quite like the iPad. It’s affordability, ease of use, long battery life, scalability, and sheer beauty are truly revolutionary. So what does this mean for market research? Here are my guesses. 1. Personal Interviewing Reinvented There will be a resurgence in face-to-face interviewing in homes, stores, malls, workplaces and anywhere else where we can go to the consumer rather than have her come to us. This type of interviewing has been on the decline because the tools are costly, slow, and antiquated (paper questionnaires, data entry, tab specs, report time). And, let’s say it, personal offline surveys have not exactly been seen as the sexy side of market research in recent years. With the iPad as a virtual clipboard, the process gets out of the way of the interview. The device takes care of questionnaire navigation, data entry and real-time results, in living color. 2. Increased Respondent Co-operation Connected to this, the iPad has the potential to more fully engage the respondent. Just imagine, a face-to-face interview with an intercepted respondent who has NOT opted into a panel with the expectation of being paid! There have been reports of much higher respondent willingness to participate once they see that the interview will be conducted on an iPad rather than the ubiquitous clipboard. Of course, the initial novelty may wear off. But I have to believe the interviewing experience using a tablet like the iPad will beat the paper questionnaire every time. 3. Multimedia Interviews The iPad will change the personal interview into a multimedia event. Questions flow smoothly, not only as text but also as beautiful graphical images. The interviewer can show the respondent a video of a new ad, or some fully realized concept boards or illustrations of alternative packages. No need to carry these materials separately – they are embedded in the program, along with the rotation and skip patterns. And if the stimuli need modification, or copy rewritten, or a question added, this can be done in real-time from a remote location. 4. Responses Beyond Text But this works both ways. In addition to gathering responses by having the interviewer or respondent herself touch the appropriate boxes, the device can also be programmed to record simultaneous audio to pick up open-ends in the respondent’s own voice, with her tone and emphasis, and time-code these as open-ends. Add to this, the ability to transcribe this audio and use sophisticated coding software AND “professional listeners” (who might very well be those data entry people you laid off), and voila! 5. DIY Market Research Of course, this will also make it much easier for small businesses to do their own market research. DIY market research is destined to grow when more survey apps are developed for both the iPad and Android platforms. At first, these will be fairly generic, on-size-fits-all apps that can be easily molded to the subject at hand. But soon, there will be apps that are customized for surveys for specific businesses, with simple templates for restaurants, retail stores, doctors’ offices, hairdressers, etc. – the kind of businesses that had been priced out of access to market research in the past. 6. Embedded Market Research With the iPad, market research can become part of the overall customer experience. Think of a restaurant of the future. The menu is now in the form of an iPad like tablet. I can browse the different selections, see photographs of today’s dishes, their nutritional information and ingredients, even customer reviews. I can order from the pad, and when my meal is over, I can rate what I have eaten and the service. If I want to, I can enter my responses as additional comments, in text or audibly. This can be done while I am paying my bill, also on the tablet… and all this in less time than I used to spend waiting for my credit card to be processed. You’ve enhanced my experience, reduced communication errors between front-of-house and the kitchen, and done a little market research without adding cost beyond the initial set-up. 7. Online Qualitative But what about online qualitative? Here the iPad will have a huge impact. Currently the online qual video options are somewhat clumsy and fraught with risk, especially if there are technical failures in real-time. The respondent needs to pretest the equipment and connection, and may need to install a web cam expressly for the purpose of the interview. The iPad will change all this with the future introduction of face-to-face video conferencing – currently available on the iPhone4 and new iPod Touch. A few years from now, easy video conferencing will be standard on all smart phones and tablets. It will be as natural as the telephone is today. And we are not just talking about talking heads here. Screenshots and screen sharing will also be common, opening up all kinds of possibilities for real-time mobile market research. 8. Expanding Online Samples Before I get tangled in the weeds, I need to make a point about how the iPad and tablets in general will bring many of the non-techie online stragglers into the market. I did a small study among seniors, and found them to be very excited about the iPad and eager to own one. (Though many of them ARE waiting until they are sure “the bugs are out’). This is a device that appeals to both the tech-savvy and the tech-challenged. It requires little knowledge of computing beyond point & click – or swipe & touch. What could be more appropriate for market research surveys? We may finally be able to expand online reach to include a representative sample of over-55 year olds. 9. The Decline of the Web and Web Research Another big point needs to be made here. Changes in the use of the Web itself are inevitably going to have an affect on the market research industry… and those changes are being brought about by revolutionary devices like the iPad. Many people may not realize that use of the Web is on the decline and is likely to continue to decline. I’m not talking about Internet use here – that is growing both in number of hours online and the percentage of our day. But the Web is only one part of the Internet. It is the part you need a browser to access. With the iPad and smart phones, people will increasingly use apps rather than go to web sites via a browser. When they are not using apps, they will be using email, streaming Netflix, and eventually live tv. What does this mean for market research? Well, one possibility is that the demand for web usability studies may decline along with use of the web. And since apps are so much more focused, static and constantly reviewed by users in app stores, chances are there will be less interest in doing market research on new apps… especially when the app developer is a high school kid with no budget. 10. Changes in Shopping Patterns Less web, less browers, less browsing? There are already apps from the leading retailers, ebay, craigslist, etc. It will be interesting to see how the shift from website shopping to app-based shopping will change shopping patterns and decision making. Will shopping be more focused, less comparative? Chances are the iPad shopper will modify her behavior in some ways – but we have yet to understand how. Well, these are my first thoughts on the subject. Obviously I’ve guessed about what is to come and may have missed a lot. What about you? How do you see tablet computers like the iPad changing market research in the future?

About Frankie Johnson - Frankie is the owner of Researcharts (http://www.researcharts.com). She has been involved in qualitative market research, both as a client and a practitioner, for over 35 years. She's personally conducted thousands of focus groups, trained several successful moderators and was among the first to do online qualitative research. She has worked with many high profile companies such as Quaker Oats, Sears, Kimberly-Clark, Keebler, Kraft, Boston Consulting Group, Norwest Bank, Frito-Lay, Amoco and many more. She was was also an Executive VP of Millward Brown, a prominent market research company with a global clientele. She is an emeritus member of AMA and founding member of QRCA. She is also a techie, she had one of the first car phones in 1987. In keeping with that she is a huge fan of the iPad as well!

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Feature Enhancements: Capture Field Respondent Signatures with SurveyPocket App

Thanks to the IFC show, "Portlandia," the new Portland catch phrase is "Put a bird on it."With SurveyPocket's new Signature Feature our catch phrase is "Put a Sig on it."



What is the Signature Feature?

SurveyPocket's signature feature allows for you to collect your survey participant's signature while in the field. Whether you are looking to use SurveyPocket to collect signatures for a new state initiative, need respondents to sign a non-disclosure agreement, or want to help your daughter win class president at her high school, you can now now enable this when you create your survey on SurveyAnalytics.com.

To enable signature collection, you'll first need to create a new question under

Add New Question >> Advanced Question Types >> Attach/Upload File.









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Next, you'll need to select Data Input Type >> Signature/Hand-Drawing.









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In order to require your participant to sign, you can add this by updating the settings to enable validation.









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When you use SurveyPocket on your device, you will now see the signature feature integrated into your survey.









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